Salinity Classification – Severe (subsoil salinity 16-32 dS/m ECe)

Such sites are only suitable for highly salt tolerant plants. There will usually be significant areas of bare ground and it is likely that salt crystals will form on the soil surface over summer. Waterlogging is common, and trees will usually be dead or dying. High waterlogging would indicate that the watertable was consistently above 0.3m in winter or 1.0m in summer.

Indicator species for high levels of waterlogging:

Samphire, glasswort, curly ryegrass, marine couch, saltwater couch, curly ryegrass, streaked arrow grass, water buttons, creeping brookweed, puccinellia, distichlis, bare ground.

Salinity Classification – Extreme (subsoil salinity 16-32 dS/m ECe)

Only the most salt and waterlogging tolerant species can survive at these salinity levels and saltland pastures are not an option. High waterlogging would indicate that the watertable was consistently above 0.3m in winter or 1.0m in summer.

Indicator species for high levels of waterlogging:

Samphire, glasswort, water buttons, bare ground

Download the 'nypa scale' conversion chart

Suggested classification system for categorisation of soil salinity in Australia (Barrett-Lennard, Bennett and Colmer, 2008)

SUGGESTED
TERM
ECe RANGE
(dS/m)
FOR SANDS EC1:5 RANGE
FOR LOAMS
FOR CLAYS TYPICAL PLANTS
AFFECTED
Non-saline 0-2 0–0.14 0–0.18 0–0.25 -
Low salinity 2–4 0.15–0.28 0.19–0.36 0.26–0.50 Beans
Moderate salinity 4–8 0.29–0.57 0.37–0.72 0.51–1.00 Barley
High salinity 8–16 0.58–1.14 0.73–1.45 1.01–2.00 River saltbush,
saltwater couch
Severe salinity 16–32 1.15–2.28 1.46–2.90 2.01–4.00 Puccinellia
Extreme salinity >32 >2.29 >2.91 >4.01 Samphire

For more information on indicator species, see the SALTdeck Cards